Tài liệu Pipelines 2018 utility engineering, surveying, and multidisciplinary topics

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Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. Pipelines 2018 Utility Engineering, Surveying, and Multidisciplinary Topics Papers from Sessions of the Pipelines 2018 Conference Toronto, Ontario, Canada July 15–18, 2018 Edited by Christopher C. Macey, P.Eng. Jason S. Lueke, Ph.D., P.Eng. Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. PIPELINES 2018 Utility Engineering, Surveying, and Multidisciplinary Topics PROCEEDINGS OF SESSIONS OF THE PIPELINES 2018 CONFERENCE July 15–18, 2018 Toronto, Ontario, Canada SPONSORED BY Utility Engineering and Surveying Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers EDITED BY Christopher C. Macey, P.Eng. Jason S. Lueke, Ph.D., P.Eng. Published by the American Society of Civil Engineers Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. Published by American Society of Civil Engineers 1801 Alexander Bell Drive Reston, Virginia, 20191-4382 www.asce.org/publications | ascelibrary.org Any statements expressed in these materials are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent the views of ASCE, which takes no responsibility for any statement made herein. No reference made in this publication to any specific method, product, process, or service constitutes or implies an endorsement, recommendation, or warranty thereof by ASCE. The materials are for general information only and do not represent a standard of ASCE, nor are they intended as a reference in purchase specifications, contracts, regulations, statutes, or any other legal document. ASCE makes no representation or warranty of any kind, whether express or implied, concerning the accuracy, completeness, suitability, or utility of any information, apparatus, product, or process discussed in this publication, and assumes no liability therefor. The information contained in these materials should not be used without first securing competent advice with respect to its suitability for any general or specific application. Anyone utilizing such information assumes all liability arising from such use, including but not limited to infringement of any patent or patents. ASCE and American Society of Civil Engineers—Registered in U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Photocopies and permissions. Permission to photocopy or reproduce material from ASCE publications can be requested by sending an e-mail to permissions@asce.org or by locating a title in ASCE's Civil Engineering Database (http://cedb.asce.org) or ASCE Library (http://ascelibrary.org) and using the “Permissions” link. Errata: Errata, if any, can be found at https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784481660 Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Civil Engineers. All Rights Reserved. ISBN 978-0-7844-8166-0 (PDF) Manufactured in the United States of America. Pipelines 2018 iii Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. Preface Pipelines are the arteries of the modern world that convey the essence of what drives quality of life, commerce, and public health for all of society. Whether conveying drinking water, collecting wastewater, storage and conveyance of storm water, or transport of petroleum or other fluids – pipelines are one of the most essential elements of modern infrastructure that impacts the way we live and ability to improve the world around us. This year’s conference theme is Revitalizing Global Underground Utility Infrastructure. It focuses on the awareness that pipelines are a global topic essential to our quality of life; that we have common issues and concerns independent of our nationality; and that our industry can work together to truly develop solutions without borders. This is an exciting realization that holds hope and promise for our future. In coordination with the American Society of Civil Engineers, the technical program and this publication were planned and implemented by the Technical Program Committee, led by the Technical Co-Chairs. A call for abstracts was made for the first Pipelines conference outside of the United States, from which well over 300 abstracts were submitted. These abstracts were then sorted into tracks based on the general topic areas of Condition Assessment, Planning and Design, Construction and Rehabilitation, Utility Engineering and Survey, Multi-discipline, and Technical Posters. In addition, 5 panel sessions were included with topics from Women in Engineering to Ethics to Emergency Response as well as other specialized technical topics. This resulted in an extraordinarily high-quality program containing 175 papers and 15 poster presentations. For publication purposes, technical papers from the eight presentation tracks were consolidated into the following three subjects: 1- Pipelines 2018: Planning & Design, 2- Pipelines 2018: Condition Assessment and Construction & Rehabilitation, and 3- Pipelines 2018: Multidiscipline Topics and Utility Engineering and Survey. On behalf of the Technical Program Committee, we are pleased to offer you the Proceedings of ASCE Pipelines 2018 “Revitalizing Global Underground Utility Infrastructure”. Yours truly, Chris Macey, P.Eng., M.ASCE and Jason Lueke, Ph.D., P.Eng., M.ASCE Technical Co-Chairs © ASCE Pipelines 2018 iv Acknowledgments Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. Technical Program Committee Technical Program Co-Chairs Chris Macey, P.Eng., AECOM Jason S. Lueke, Ph.D., P.Eng., Associated Engineering Conference Co-Chairs Tennyson Muindi, P.E., McMillen Jacobs Associates William Fernandes, Toronto Water Technical Program Track Chairs Jeff W. Heidrick, P.E., ENV SP, Burns & McDonnell, Planning and Design Shaoqing Ge, Ph.D., American Water, Planning and Design Roberts McMullin, P.E., EBMUD, Condition Assessment Felipe Pulido, P.E., Arcadis Condition Assessment Track Murat Engindeniz, P.E., Simpson Gumpertz and Heger, Construction & Rehabilitation Duane Strayer, P.Eng, Associated Engineering, Construction & Rehabilitation Doug Jenkins, P.E., CH2M, Utility Engineering and Surveying Mark Mihm, P.E., HDR Multidiscipline Scott Christensen, PE., HDR, Poster Coordinator Pre-Conference Workshop Leads Workshop Chair – Erin McGuire, P.E., CDM Smith Nathan Faber, P.E. - Large Diameter Pipeline Forum Andrea Chisholm, PMP - Soft Factors of Project Success and a Partnering-Based Model of Project Delivery Jerry Colburn - Right-of-Way Considerations in Pipeline Routing Sri Rajah, Ph.D., P.E., G.E., S.E., P.Eng. - Upcoming MOP on Seismic Design of Buried Water & Wastewater Pipelines Mark Knight, Ph.D., P.Eng. - Save Construction Time and Money with Subsurface Utility Engineering (SUE) ASCE Staff Corinne Addison Cristina Charron Ricardo Colon Donna Dickert Susan Dunne Brian Foor Aaron Koepper Allison Ly © ASCE Carolyn Martin Nives McLarty Andrew Moore Susan Reid Sean Scully John Segna Trevor Williams Pipelines 2018 v Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. The Technical Program Co-Chairs and the Steering Committee would like to thank the over 80 individuals which participated as part of the 2018 Technical Committee. Everyone worked as a team to review abstracts, papers, and posters, and continued to collaborate throughout the construction of this year’s technical program. Most of the below technical committee members also served as moderators for the conference. Pat Acker, P.E., P.L.S. Brian Ball George Bontus, P.Eng Mike Brannon Adam Braun, P.Eng William Brick, P.E., BCEE Keith Bushdiecker, P.E. Dave Caughlin Kyle Couture, P.E. Robert Cullwell, P.E. Matthew Duffy, PE William Elledge, P.E. Christine Ellenberger, P.E. Michael Fleury, P.E., BCEE Tober Francom, Ph.D. Amin Ganjidoost Hadi Ganjidoost Chris Garrett Matt Gaughan, P.E. Jim Geisbush, P.E. Ahmad Habibian, Ph.D., P.E. Christopher Haeckler, P.E. Neil Harvey Shelly Hattan, P.E., CCM Cliff Jones Brent Keil, P.E., SCWI Josh Kercho, P.E. Sharareh Kermanshachi, Ph.D., P.E., LEED AP, PMP Joel Koenig, P.E. Steven Kramer, P.E. Ian Lancaster Mike Larsen Jeff LeBlanc Bryon Livingston, P.E. Charles Marsh Cian McDermott, P.Eng Rich Mielke, P.E. Antonio Miglio, Ph.D., P.Eng. Peter Nardini, P.E. Henry Polvi, P.E. Mark Poppe, P.E. Anna Pridmore, Ph.D., P.E. Sri Rajah, Ph.D., P.E. Mellownie Salvador Eric Schey Walt Schwarz, PE Veysel (Firat) Sever, Ph.D., P.E., BCEE Ad Shatat, P.Eng Jonathan Shirk, P.E. Jeffrey Shoaf, P.E., PMP William Shook Jerry Snead, P.E. Andrew Sneed, P.E. Andrew Sparks, P.E. Ross Standifer, P.E. Andrew Stanton, P.E. James Steele Alan Swartz, P.E. Jeni Tatum, P.E. Sanjay Tewari Gary Thompson, MMP Daniel Toft Berk Uslu, Ph.D. Ricardo Vieira, P.E. Bob Walker, P.E., MPA Toby Weickert Andrew Williams, P.E. Kas Zurek The Technical Program Co-Chairs also thank the authors and exhibitors for their dedication to the industry in presenting at this conference. Without your contributions, the conference would not be possible. © ASCE Pipelines 2018 Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. And lastly, the Technical Program Co-Chairs express special thanks to Tennyson Muindi and William Fernandes, Conference Co-Chairs, and the Steering Committee for their efforts and leadership during the planning and execution of Pipelines 2018 Conference. © ASCE vi Pipelines 2018 vii Contents Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. Asset Management Water and Energy Efficiency: Transmission Operations Optimizer (TOO) City of Toronto Water Supply ...................................................................................... 1 Gary Thompson, Rose Hosseinzadeh, Alnoor Allidina, Henry Polvi, and Jacek Błaszczyk Ahead of the Curve: Lake Huron and Elgin Area Water Systems Develop Their Asset Management Program .......................................................................................... 9 Heather Edwards, Billy Haklander, and Andrew Henry The City of Montreal’s Experience with Pipeline Asset Management .................................. 17 Serge Martin Paul and Brian Brochu Tarrant Regional Water District’s Asset Management of the Pipeline System Using GIS .................................................................................................................... 26 Jason Gehrig, Courtney Jalbert, and Lauren Tijerina Defining a Sustainable Underground Infrastructure Framework: ISO Asset Management and ISO Life Cycle .................................................................................. 37 Gregory M. Baird and Tad Radzinski Fixing the O&M Budget with Asset Management to Create More Capital Debt Capacity for Pipe Projects ............................................................................................. 43 Gregory M. Baird Cost, Risk, Performance: Icon Water’s Sewer Network Investment Plan............................ 53 Andy Gibson, Sagar Khadka, and Mark Engelhardt Construction Understanding Hot Tapping and Plugging as an Effective Procedure to Facilitate Relocation, Repair, or Modification of Water Infrastructure When Uninterrupted Operation is Necessary ........................................................................ 63 Charles Herckis Using Air Caster Technology to Install Large Diameter Pipe in a Tunnel ........................... 74 Shelly Hattan, Robert Fults, and Charles Cameron Design DC Water at Work: Using a Composite Liner Design to Rejuvenate the Service Life of Large Sewer Tunnels ...................................................................................... 82 Steve Bian, Renni Zhao, Mandy LeBlanc, and Qi He © ASCE Pipelines 2018 viii Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. Results of a Full-Scale Fault-Offset Test on a Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Pipe ........................................................................................................................... 93 Hendrik Williams, Amir Fam, and Ian Moore The Tree Amigos: Friendly Practices to Avoid, Minimize, and Mitigate Impacts to a Forested Wetland ............................................................................................. 103 Chris Bogert, Paul Dossett, David Flores, and Todd Butler DC Water at Work: Tackling Fast Track CIP with In-House Design of SIPP ....................................................................................................................................... 113 Steve Bian, Renni Zhao, and Mandy LeBlanc Thirlmere—Past, Present, and Future ................................................................................. 124 S. Greenwood and J. Hilton Olmsted Flowline Seismic Retrofit ....................................................................................... 135 Mitchell Dabling and Cort Lambson Inspection New Developments in Multi-Sensor Condition Assessment Technologies for Large Diameter Pipe Infrastructure............................................................................... 142 Csaba Ékes Multi-Sensor Inspection Comes to Salt Lake City, Utah ..................................................... 149 Emma McGowan, Doug Jenkins, Derek Velarde, and Mark Wade Optimizing Utility Valuation Using Acoustic Condition Assessment Technologies .......................................................................................................................... 159 John Marciszewski and Anthony Festa Materials Evaluation of the Environmental Sustainability during Fabrication of Commonly Used Pipe Materials ........................................................................................... 168 Alhossin Alsadi, John Matthews, and Elizabeth Matthews How Green Are You? Economic and Environmental Sustainability: Assessing the Global Warming Potential (GMP) of Your Underground Infrastructure ........................................................................................................................ 177 Gregory M. Baird and Tad Radzinski Planning Is It a Road Project or a Water Main Project? .................................................................... 186 Moubin Al-Malla and Cassandra Marshall © ASCE Pipelines 2018 ix Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. Analyzing Conflicts over Water Extraction from Great Lakes of North America through Game Theory Approaches ....................................................................... 195 Sevda Payganeh, Mark A. Knight, and Carl T. Haas Transmission Pipeline Route Analysis to Support Growing Water Demand.................................................................................................................................. 204 Daniel Huffines and Chris Leathers The U.S. City’s Resilient Solution......................................................................................... 215 Peter D. Dyke and Sarah Eisenstat Project Management Urgent Need Drives Record Completion of 42-Inch Pipeline in Flint, Michigan ...................................................................................................................... 224 K. Couture and M. Raysin Trans-Basin Pipelines as a Solution to Water Resources: A Network for Water Resilience and Economic Vitality .............................................................................. 234 Maury D. Gaston Some of the Perils and Benefits When Design Responsibility Is Moved Down the Process toward Contractors and Manufacturers ................................................ 245 Dennis A. Dechant Who Are You Going to Call? On-Call Contracting for Large Diameter Water Line Repairs ............................................................................................................... 254 James Wilson, Gregory Henry, and Benjamin McCray Stopping and Re-Starting a $90 Million Pipeline Project Is Harder Than It Looks .................................................................................................................................. 264 James Light, Matt Turney, Mike Gossett, and Randy Parks The Only Constant Is Change—Lessons Learned in Construction Staffing .................................................................................................................................. 275 Todd Warrix and Andrea Beymer DIGGS Does Pipelines .......................................................................................................... 281 Robert Bachus, Allen Cadden, and Nikolaos Machairas Research Using Augmented Reality in Horizontal Directional Drilling to Reduce the Risk of Utility Damages .................................................................................................. 290 Amr Fenais, Nikolas Smilovsky, and Samuel T. Ariaratnam © ASCE Pipelines 2018 x Seismic Large Diameter Couplings for Seismic Conditions.............................................................. 299 Chris Sundberg Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. Utilities Why Are These Record Drawings So Inaccurate?............................................................... 304 Roger Beieler Developing a New Pressure Plane at Super Speeds: Fort Worth Northside IV 24” Water Main .............................................................................................. 311 Olivia Kerss, Daniel Stoutenburg Jr., and Roberto C. Sauceda Assessment of Potential Damage to Utilities Due to Tunneling and Excavation ...................................................................................................................... 319 Masoud Manzari, Sandra Rolfe-Dickinson, Richard Atkinson, and Mohamed Hosney Deep Lake Water Intakes: Construction, Operation, and Maintenance of the City of Toronto and Enwave Corporation Deep Lake Water Intakes ..................................................................................................... 329 Niall Robertson and Mike Brannon Maintaining Reliability of a Cooling Water Supply System: 20 Years of Lessons Learned ................................................................................................ 333 Robert Lotts, Jerald Moreland, Doug Anderson, Mehdi Zarghamee, Peter Nardini, Shabbir Pittalwala, Rafael Balderrama, and Anna Pridmore © ASCE Pipelines 2018 1 Water and Energy Efficiency: Transmission Operations Optimizer (TOO) City of Toronto Water Supply Gary Thompson1; Rose Hosseinzadeh2; Alnoor Allidina, Ph.D., P.Eng., C.Eng.3; Henry Polvi, P.Eng.4; and Jacek Błaszczyk, Ph.D.5 Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. 1 City of Toronto, Toronto Water, Water Supply, 235 Cottingham St., Toronto, ON M4V 1C7. E-mail: Gary.Thompson@toronto.ca 2 City of Toronto, Toronto Water, Water Supply, 235 Cottingham St., Toronto, ON M4V 1C7. E-mail: Rose.Hosseinzadeh@toronto.ca 3 IBI Group, 9133 Leslie St., Suite 201, Richmond Hill, ON, Canada L4B 4N1. E-mail: Alnoor.Allidina@IBIGroup.com 4 City of Toronto, Toronto Water, Water Supply, 235 Cottingham St., Toronto, ON M4V 1C7. E-mail: Henry.Polvi@toronto.ca 5 Research and Academic Computer Network (NASK), Warsaw, Poland. E-mail: jacekb@nask.pl ABSTRACT This paper describes the implementation of an automatic control system based on operational optimization, for city of Toronto and York Region Water Transmission System. The new automation system has been in operation since November 2015. The water supply system, serving a population of 3.4 million, is the largest in Canada and one of the largest in North America. The system consists of treated water pumping at four filtration plants, 18 pumping stations, 15 reservoirs/tanks, 126 pumps (up to 1,865 kW (2,500 hp)), and approximately 500 km (310 miles) of large transmission mains. While the city of Toronto and the region of York provide the water delivery/service requirements in a cost effective and uninterrupted manner, the complexity of the water system and the volatility and complex structure of the energy rates, present opportunities for benefitting from automation and further optimizing operations. As part of the new automation process, the transmission operations optimizer (TOO) minimizes energy used and cost of energy, while ensuring fundamental service delivery standards including pressure, flow, and storage are met. Pre-set minimum (critical) storage levels are not violated. ‘Optimal’ automatic control strategies are achieved for different seasonal, weekday/weekend demand patterns, as well as when abnormal events occur such as a pumping station or filtration plant being taken out-of-service. TOO involves water consumption/demand prediction, energy rate prediction, hydraulic modeling, mathematical optimization, analytical algorithms, data integration and on-line monitoring of system performance, and energy spot-market rate. INTRODUCTION Toronto Water, division of the City of Toronto, provides drinking, wastewater and storm water services to 3.4 million residents and businesses. It owns CAD$28.3 billion dollars in infrastructure. Toronto Water is primarily responsible for the operation of the Water System. Within Toronto Water, the Water Supply unit, consisting of 60 staff and a separate control room operation, is responsible for the pumpage, storage and transmission of drinking water. The supply system is a large, complex and integrated system which consists of 4 large water treatment plants, 500 km (310 miles) of large diameter transmission mains, 18 pumping stations, 15 reservoirs and tanks, and 126 pumping units with a 1,200 MLD (317 MGD) average consumption distributed over 6 pressure zones & 13 pressure districts. This trunk water main, © ASCE Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. Pipelines 2018 transmission system, then supplies the local distribution water main system. The Water Supply unit also supplies water to a significant portion of southern York Region. Prior to the implementation of TOO, the Water Supply system within the City of Toronto was essentially manually operated. Manual operation consisted of an operator, guided by various standard operations and maintenance procedures, determined pump start / stop and run durations. This methodology was utilized to manage routine and non-routine situations. Non-routine situations include pumping units out of service, hydro failure, water treatment plant down time, etc. Electrical energy costs make up the most significant portion of the operating budget of an integrated system of this scale. On average Toronto spends CAD$40 million annually on electrical energy costs of which CAD$26 million of that is the responsibility of the Water Supply unit. Over 90% of the energy required for the Toronto-York water system is managed by Toronto Water. Energy pricing in Ontario can be volatile and complex since it includes commodity charges (energy kWh, based on the spot market), demand charges (max kW, kVA) and Global Adjustment (GA) charges. As a result, the development and utilization of an automated optimized pumping solution would provide significant savings. This being the case, the City of Toronto and York Region partnered to develop TOO which provides opportunities to leverage reservoir storage, automation, energy price predictions, hydraulic modelling and historical data to create daily station schedules to reduce electricity use and cost. With the implementation of TOO on November 9, 2015, Water Supply moved from a “computer manual” operation to an “optimized” automated operation. Tables 1a and 1b provide data showing the average power for the Water Supply pumping stations. ENERGY SAVING OPPORTUNITIES Transmission Operations Optimizer (TOO) is a custom designed, “real-time", online software that automatically determines optimal pumping control strategies. TOO will minimize electrical costs at all times: amidst electrical power cost variations, planned / unplanned equipment downtime, demand / storage variations; while maintaining customer service standards for pressures, flows, and reservoir storage levels. TOO inputs consist of real-time weather data, Hydro (power/energy) rates, SCADA data and past water demand data which are used by sophisticated software algorithms in the “Smart Real-time Water System Control System” [1] to generate an output control strategy, displayed as pump schedules and reservoir profiles. These optimal strategies are reviewed and approved by a Water System operator. The approved strategy is then automatically transferred directly to SCADA. See Figure 1. The pumps then start / stop in accordance with the strategy. Table 1a - Water Supply Energy Demand, Water Treatment Plants (average kW (hp)) Water Treatment Plants Pumping Stations kW (hp) R.C. Harris 5,060 (6,782) R.L. Clark 6,700 (8,981) F.J. Horgan 4,770 (6,394) Island 800 (1,072) WTP Total 17,330 (23,230) © ASCE 2 Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. Pipelines 2018 3 Table 1b - Water Supply Energy Demand, Pumping Stations (average kW (hp)) Pumping Station kW (hp) John Street 2,955 (3,960) Ellesmere 2,762 (3,700) Richview 1,500 (2,010) Rosehill 1,190 (1,595) High Level 1,125 (1,508) Keele 806 (1,080) Eglinton 736 (986) Scarborough 533 (714) West Toronto 483 (647) Milliken 460 (616) St Albans 460 (616) Lawrence 443 (594) Armour Heights 432 (579) Kennedy 351 (470) Parkdale 325 (435) William Johnston 248 (332) Thornhill 18 (24) PS Total 14,827 (19,875) Real-time Weather Data Hydro Rates SCADA Data TRANSMISSION SMART REALOPERATIONS TIME WATER OPTIMIZER SYSTEM CONTROL Output to SCADA (Control Strategy) Past Demand Data Figure 1. Schematic of Transmission Operations Optimizer Real-time weather data contains the latest current conditions and 7 day forecast details from Environment Canada. Hydro real time and predicted rates inputs are obtained from the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO). SCADA real time and historical inputs are obtained from City and Region network data servers. Historical demand data is also obtained from the network data servers. In general, TOO runs as follows [1] (See Figure 2): 1. Collect external factors including weather, energy rates, system status and data. This includes, but is not limited to, reservoir levels, equipment out-of-service, equipment auto/manual modes, and production costs 2. Run demand model to predict demand © ASCE Pipelines 2018 4 Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. 3. Determine potential optimal strategies in conjunction with hydraulic & quality model 4. Analyze results to check strategies 5. If results are acceptable, apply strategy to SCADA systems, otherwise re-run Optimizer with changes to the constraints. Figure 2. Transmission Operations Optimizer (TOO) Architecture OPTIMIZER AND PUMP CONTROL TOO operation ("a run") can be initiated manually by the operator or automatically based on scheduled time and on various “triggers". (See Figure 3). These triggers are based on equipment status changes, storage profile deviations or energy rate deviations. Once an optimizer “run” is complete and a new strategy (pump schedule and reservoir profiles) (see Figure 4) is available, the operator reviews the strategy (primarily pump schedule) to ensure that the pumps and the run times appear reasonable. Additional information is available for review, including predicted reservoir profiles, if required. Once these conditions are met, the operator “accepts” the solution which allows the schedule to be transferred automatically from the TOO system to SCADA. If a proposed schedule is declined by the operator, the operator can change some parameters (such as limits), and then re-run TOO to provide an alternate solution based on new system conditions. Note that this alternate solution will be optimal with respect to the latest conditions. The option also exists for specifying manual pump start / stop times at individual pumping stations if required. SYSTEM IMPACTS TOO pumping strategy tends to achieve an increase in flow rate when energy costs are low and conversely decrease flow decreases when energy costs are high. (See Figure 5) TOO pumping strategy results in an overall change in reservoir storage profile patterns. For example, storage levels tend to be lower and vary over the course of a week from the period prior to TOO usage (see Figure 6). © ASCE Pipelines 2018 5 Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. CONCLUSION / BENEFITS TOO was launched on November 9, 2015. Since then, energy savings have been approximately 8 Million kWh (27,315 Million Btu) per year. This is equivalent to 5,000 tonnes (5,512 tons) of Carbon Dioxide emissions not pumped into the environment. This equates to:  20 Million km (12.4 Million miles) driven by an average passenger vehicle, or  1,200 passenger vehicles driven for one year, or  Annual electricity use for 800 homes, or  13,000 barrels of oil consumed. Figure 3. TOO Run Triggers and Controls Energy cost saving obtained is approximately CAD$1.38 Million/Year. Figure 7 shows the reduction in actual energy per unit of water pumped. Future improved costs savings are expected as TOO function and water system facility infrastructure and practices are enhanced. Results have been verified by City, Toronto Hydro and third party reviewers. As a result of TOO, Water Supply has received incentives, recognition and awards such as:  Toronto Hydro Save on Energy Award of CAD$1,628,595.00 in 2016  City of Toronto City Manager's Award 2016  Recognition in the Environmental Commissioner of Ontario – “Every Drop Counts” 2016-2017 Annual Energy Conservation Report © ASCE Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. Pipelines 2018 © ASCE 6 Figure 4. TOO Pump Schedule Figure 5. Transmission Operations Optimizer (TOO) Pumping Station Flow and Rate Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. Pipelines 2018 7 Figure 6. Keele Reservoir profile change 2015 vs 2017 Figure 7. Transmission Operations Optimizer (TOO) - Energy Savings © ASCE Pipelines 2018 TOO's operational flexibility, which facilitates it's utilization in a fully or partially automated mode of operation, allows it to compliment Global Adjustment, Demand Response or other energy optimizing activities providing additional opportunities for increased savings with respect to market energy rate triggers. Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. REFERENCES 1. J. Błaszczyk, K. Malinowski, and A. Allidina. Optimal Pump Scheduling by Non-Linear Programming for Large Scale Water Transmission System. In N. Callaos, T.G. Gill, and B. Sánchez, editors, Proc. CCISE 2013, pages 7–12, Winter Garden, Florida, U.S.A., 2013. International Institute of Informatics and Systemics (IIIS). 2. K. Malinowski, J. Błaszczyk, and A. Allidina. Optimizing Control for Large Scale Dynamic Systems; General Issues and Case Study Results: Transmission Operations Optimizer for Toronto Water System. In The 23rd ICE/IEEE International Technology Management Conference (ITMC), Madeira Is- land, Portugal, June 27-29, 2017, page 8. IEEE, June 2017. 3. J. Błaszczyk, K. Malinowski, and A. Allidina. Aggregated Pumping Station Operation Planning Problem (APSOP) for Large Scale Water Transmission System. In K. Jónasson, editor, Proc. PARA 2010, volume 7133 of Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pages 260– 269, Berlin / Heidelberg, 2012. Springer-Verlag Inc. © ASCE 8 Pipelines 2018 9 Ahead of the Curve: Lake Huron and Elgin Area Water Systems Develop Their Asset Management Program Heather Edwards1; Billy Haklander, P.Eng.2; and Andrew Henry, P.Eng.3 Downloaded from ascelibrary.org by RMIT UNIVERSITY LIBRARY on 01/03/19. Copyright ASCE. For personal use only; all rights reserved. 1 Pure Technologies, Pure HM a Division of Pure Technologies Ltd., 5055 Satellite Dr., Mississauga, ON L4W 5K7. E-mail: heather.edwards@puretechltd.com 2 Lake Huron and Elgin Area Primary Water Supply Systems c/o City of London Regional Water Supply, 235 North Centre Rd., Suite 200, London, ON N5X 4E7. E-mail: bhakland@london.ca 3 Lake Huron and Elgin Area Primary Water Supply Systems c/o City of London Regional Water Supply, 235 North Centre Rd., Suite 200, London, ON N5X 4E7. E-mail: ahenry@london.ca ABSTRACT The Lake Huron Water System and Elgin Area Water System are regional water systems that supply water to 15-member municipalities serving approximately 500,000 people across 5,000 square kilometers (1930 square miles) of southwestern Ontario. Their advanced and innovative asset management plan and asset management program are based on a customer level of service approach and risk mitigation framework which, in part, relies on condition assessments and operational data to determine proactive, cost-effective, and timely investments in this regionally significant infrastructure. Since their construction 50 years ago, the 1200mm (48-inch) primary transmission pipeline on the Lake Huron system has suffered 4 failures and is entering a critical stage in its life-cycle. Water pipeline operators have many technologies and techniques that enable them to determine the condition of their conveyance assets, their deterioration rate, and probability of failure. By quantifying and monitoring damage on their assets, the Lake Huron water system is able to categorize the structural damage found, allowing them to prioritize their rehabilitation program, and allocate funds on a systemic basis. This approach to pipeline asset management has supported the extension of the serviceable life of critical infrastructure by identifying urgent repair needs, improving maintenance, and capital planning. The program demonstrates that by collecting quantitative data and incorporated into an effective asset management program, significant amounts of money for infrastructure renewal can be saved while minimizing service disruptions. INTRODUCTION The Lake Huron Water System and Elgin Area Water System are regional water systems that supply water to 15-member municipalities serving approximately 500,000 people across 5,000 square kilometers (1930 square miles) of southwestern Ontario. The Lake Huron Primary Transmission Main is a 1200-millimetre (48-inch) diameter pipeline carrying potable water 47 kilometres (29 miles) from the Water Treatment Plant on Lake Huron to the City of London, and seven other municipalities within the region. The Lake Huron Primary Transmission Main was constructed in 1965 and consists of prestressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP). The Lake Huron Primary Transmission Main has experienced 4 previous failures – in 1983, 1988, 2010 and 2012. As a response to the failures, the Lake Huron Primary Water Supply System (LHPWSS) undertook a pipeline twinning program to create redundancy and operational improvements in the system. Construction on the twin line occurred in 1996 and 2013, with 28 © ASCE
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