Tài liệu Teach yourself photoshop 2016 UK

  • Số trang: 224 |
  • Loại file: PDF |
  • Lượt xem: 34 |
  • Lượt tải: 0

Mô tả:

Teach yourself photoshop 2016 UK
Teach yourself Photoshop PLUS! 224 PAGES OF EXPERT PHOTO ADVICE Teach yourself 12 EXPERT VIDEO LESSONS LEARN PHOTOSHOP AND CREATIVE CLOUD TODAY Photoshop Inside this issue... Completely revised and updated for 2016 Covers the latest features of Photoshop CC ϑ6WHSE\VWHSJXLGHV ϑ(GLWSKRWRVOLNHDSUR ϑ0DVWHUPDVNV ϑ/HDUQDOODERXWOD\HUV ϑ3URFHVV5DZӾOHV ϑ&XUYHVPDGHHDV\ ϑ(YHU\WRROH[SODLQHG WATCH VIDEO www.bit.ly/ pmz63video Teach yourself Photoshop The photographic process starts the moment you press the camera’s shutter release button, but it doesn’t end there. Sometimes the camera makes a mistake, you compose the picture in a rush or an unwanted object needs to be cloned out, and you need the help of an imageediting program to put things right. The camera also captures the world in a very literal way, so that the image you see on your computer screen can look like a rather pale imitation of what you saw in your mind’s eye. This is where you need a really good image-editing program, and Photoshop is the best there is. It has a reputation for being difficult, but in fact it’s a supremely well-designed application with a clean and simple interface that’s welcoming for beginners but offers experts all the power they need. Photoshop can fix those annoying flaws that stand between a good photo and a great one; it can help you restore the drama, beauty and atmosphere you’re trying to capture, and – as well all know – it can ‘supercharge’ reality to produce images that simply take your breath away, So we’ve put together this guide to help you get the very best from Photoshop CC and your own photography. We show you how to organise your images using Bridge or Lightroom, get the best possible quality from your raw files with Adobe Camera Raw, and unleash the full power of Photoshop’s selections, masks and layers tools. We’d also like to offer you 40% off our accompanying 50-part Teach yourself Photoshop DVD training course. To claim the discount, simply use the voucher code MFMDVD at www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk/photography-dvd See more details about this offer on page 166. Rod Lawton, Editor Look out for this logo whenever a tutorial has an accompanying video Teach yourself Photoshop GET THE FILES HERE: http://bit.ly/typs2016 Teach Yourself Photoshop Future Publishing Limited Quay House, The Ambury, Bath BA1 1UA www.digitalcameraworld.com Editor Series Editor Art Editor Rod Lawton Chris George Rodney Dive FUTURE PUBLISHING LIMITED Editorial Director Group Editor-in-Chief Group Art Director Managing Director Matt Pierce Chris George Rodney Dive Joe McEvoy ADVERTISING Senior Sales Executive Sasha McGregor Tel: +44 (0)1225 788186 sasha.mcgregor@futurenet.com PRINT & PRODUCTION Production Controller Vivienne Calvert vivienne.calvert@futurenet.com LICENSING Senior Licensing and Syndication Manager Matt Ellis matt.ellis@futurenet.com Printed in the UK by William Gibbons on behalf of Future. Distributed in the UK by Seymour Distribution Ltd, 2 East Poultry Avenue, London EC1A 9PT. Phone: + 44 (0)20 7429 4000 Future produces carefully targeted magazines, websites and events for people with a passion. Our portfolio includes more than 180 magazines, websites and events, and we export or license our publications to 90 countries around the world. Future plc is a public company quoted on the London Stock Exchange (symbol: FUTR). Chief executive Zillah Byng-Thorne Non-executive chairman Peter Allen Chief financial director Penny Ladkin-Brand Tel: +44 (0) 1225 442244 www.futureplc.com All information contained in this magazine is for informational purposes only and is, to the best of our knowledge, correct at the time of going to press. Future Publishing Limited cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies that occur. Readers are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers direct with regard to pricing. © Future Publishing Limited 2016. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be used or reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. The text paper in this magazine is totally chlorine free. The paper manufacturer and Future Publishing have been independently certified in accordance with the rules of the Forest Stewardship Council. 4 Teach yourself Photoshop CHAPTER 1 Organise your images 6 Introducing the Lightroom workspace ..................................... 8 How Lightroom and Photoshop work together .................... 10 Introducing the Bridge workspace............................................12 Import your photos into Bridge..................................................14 Add metadata and keywords to your images.........................16 Organise your images in Bridge................................................20 CHAPTER 2 Raw file processing 22 Introducing the Camera Raw editor.........................................24 Improve contrast and colour in your raw files........................26 Do even more with Camera Raw ..............................................28 Make selective raw adjustments ..............................................30 How to remove atmospheric haze ...........................................34 Create analog effects with the Grain and Vignette tools .....36 Apply lens and perspective corrections .................................38 Select colour space, file format and export options ............40 Photoshop filters CHAPTER 3 Essential tools 42 Introducing the Photoshop workspace ..................................44 Introducing the Photoshop Tools panel ..................................46 Recompose and trim photos with the Crop tool ...................48 Learn to use Image Size and Canvas Size settings ..............52 Harness the power of adjustment layers................................54 Master Levels adjustments........................................................56 Master Curves in Photoshop .....................................................58 Adjust colours selectively with Hue/Saturation .................. 60 Create black and white images from colour photos ............62 Control adjustments with layer masks ...................................64 CHAPTER 4 Get creative with layers 66 Introducing the Layers panel .....................................................68 Resize and scale layers with the Transform tools .................70 Be creative with Blend modes................................................... 74 Organise your layers efficiently .................................................78 Add special effects using Layer Styles ....................................80 CHAPTER 5 Making selections 82 Introducing Photoshop's selection tools ................................84 Using the Eraser tools to remove backgrounds....................88 Learn to use the basic marquee selection tools....................92 How to use the Lasso tools.........................................................94 Photoshop’s intelligent selection tools ....................................96 Create precise, editable selections with the Pen tool...........98 Editing selections in Quick Mask mode.................................102 Perfect your selections using Refine Edge ...........................104 CHAPTER 6 Masks and montages CHAPTER 7 108 Introducing Photoshop layer masks.......................................110 Make better masks with the Mask Properties panel ..........112 Make a surreal portrait ...............................................................114 Paint with filters and masks ......................................................118 120 Apply editable filter effects.......................................................122 Add creative effects to your photos with filters ...................124 Edit images with the Camera Raw filter.................................130 Improve images with controlled blur .....................................132 CHAPTER 8 Common photo fixes 136 Sharpen up your images ..........................................................138 Keep the (high ISO) noise down!.............................................140 Correct distortion with the Adaptive Wide Angle tool........ 142 Remove flaws from your photos.............................................146 Explore the healing tools and their capabilities ...................150 Recompose photos with the content-aware tools..............154 Retouch portraits .......................................................................158 Introducing the Dodge and Burn tools ..................................160 Improve a landscape with dodging and burning.................164 CHAPTER 9 Creative effects 168 Make a panoramic landscape in Photoshop .......................170 Combine raw files into a panorama in Camera Raw .......... 172 Merge HDR exposures in Camera Raw..................................174 Learn how to use the HDR Toning tools ................................ 176 Create a motoring toy montage.............................................. 178 Make a smoking dancer............................................................182 Create stunning spirals .............................................................186 CHAPTER 10 Advanced features 190 Introducing Photoshop’s automated Actions .....................192 Create an Action to enhance a landscape ............................196 Explore Photoshop's creative brush tips ..............................198 Create elaborate titles and captions .....................................202 Make a 3D chess set .................................................................206 Introducing the Motion workspace ........................................210 Enhance a video clip...................................................................212 Introducing Photoshop's animation tools ............................214 Prepare your photos for print ..................................................218 Prepare your photos for web and on-screen use............... 222 5 Teach yourself Photoshop ORGANISE YOUR IMAGES 6 GET THE FILES HERE: http://bit.ly/typs2016 Teach yourself Photoshop ORGANISE YOUR IMAGES Organising images Get started in Photoshop fast by learning the best ways to import and organise your images 08 Introducing the Lightroom layout If you subscribe to Adobe’s Photography Plan, you get Photoshop Lightroom as well as Photoshop itself. Here’s an introduction to Lightroom 10 Using Lightroom with Photoshop 12 Introducing the Bridge workspace Adobe Lightroom combines the power of Adobe Camera Raw with advanced cataloguing tools. Find out how it can work alongside Photoshop If you prefer to use Adobe Bridge, learn the key areas of Bridge’s photo-organising workspace and discover how to customise it to suit your needs 14 Import your photos into Bridge 16 Add metadata and keywords to your images Import images from your camera into Bridge, and organise and convert them in preparation for editing in Photoshop Discover how to protect your photos and make them easier to find in the future using embedded image metadata 20 Organise your images in Bridge Use Bridge’s asset management tools to help you find particular pictures quickly and easily using Collections 7 Teach yourself Photoshop ORGANISE YOUR IMAGES GET THE FILES HERE: http://bit.ly/typs2016 Introducing the Lightroom layout You can use Lightroom as your photo organisational tool instead of Adobe Bridge, and here’s a guide to how it works hotoshop users now have a choice of image organisational tools. Traditionally, Photoshop has been twinned with Adobe Bridge – Bridge does the organising and Photoshop does the editing. But the introduction of Adobe Photoshop Lightroom has widened the choice. At the time of writing, Lightroom is available both as a standalone program with a P including raw files, before passing them over to Photoshop for more detailed work. So does this make Bridge obsolete? Not at all. Many photographers prefer the simplicity of Bridge and don’t need Lightroom’s more powerful – and more complex – organisational tools. However, if you start to find Bridge too restrictive and inflexible, swapping to Lightroom could make a big difference. regular ‘perpetual’ licence (Lightroom 6)’ or as part of Adobe’s subscription-based Photography Plan. The fact is, if you are using Photoshop CC then you almost certainly have access to Lightroom CC as part of your subscription package at no extra cost, and it can prove an extremely useful tool both for managing a large collection of photographs, editing them directly or ‘pre-editing’ images, Lightroom’s workflow modules From import to output, Adobe Lightroom can take care of your entire workflow 4 BOOK 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 It’s possible to design and order printed photo books entirely within Lightroom, which could prove a very useful feature for commercial photographers who want to offer their clients a range of photographic products and services. 5 SLIDESHOW This is a great way to package up a set of photographs into a multimedia presentation for clients, friends or family. Slideshows can be as simple or as complicated as you want. 6 PRINT Lightroom offers extensive print layout options for single or multiple images, with built-in templates for common output settings and the ability to create and save your own. 1 LIBRARY 2 DEVELOP 3 MAP 7 WEB This is where you import your photos into the Lightroom catalogue, organise them into Folders and Collections, add ratings, labels, keywords and more. This is where you’ll find Lightroom’s editing tools. They’re the same as those in Adobe Camera Raw, but arranged in a smart new interface. Lightroom can automatically place geotagged images on a map, and you can add location information manually to images that don’t have it. You can also create and publish web galleries directly within Lightroom, which has built-in FTP transfer for uploading straight to your web host. Teach yourself Photoshop ORGANISE YOUR IMAGES The Lightroom Library in detail Lightroom’s photo organising tools go far beyond those in Adobe Bridge 4 1 5 3 2 6 1 FOLDERS 4 FILTER BAR Lightroom does not need to move your photos when it imports them – it can simply add them to the library in their existing location. You can see the folders they’re stored in using this Folders panel and you can also rename and move photos. Whether you’re looking at photos in a folder a collection or your entire library, you can use this bar to filter them based on ratings, labels, the shooting information saved by the camera, file type (JPEG or raw) and a whole lot more. 2 COLLECTIONS 5 GRID VIEW These are ‘virtual’ collections of images, just like the ‘albums’ in other photo organising programs. When you add a photo to a collection, you’re not moving it physically, and a single photo can be in more than one collection. By default you’ll view images as thumbnails in this ‘grid’ view, but you can double-click any photo to view it at full size in ‘loupe’ view. Click once more and the view zooms in to 100 percent magnification. It’s a really quick way to check photos. 3 SMART COLLECTIONS 6 METADATA Smart collections are like ‘saved searches’. You don’t add photos to a smart collection manually; instead, you set up the smart collection with properties you want to search for, such as photos with specific keywords, ratings or shooting information. This sidebar has panels for adding keywords and editing your keyword list, adding copyright information, checking the camera’s shooting (EXIF) information and more. You can also carry out quick enhancements with the Quick Develop panel. Teach yourself Photoshop ORGANISE YOUR IMAGES GET THE FILES HERE: http://bit.ly/typs2016 Using Lightroom with Photoshop You can send images to Photoshop for in-depth editing and the new versions are added to your library ightroom and Photoshop make a great team. You can use Lightroom to organise all your images and make basic enhancements before handing off your photos to Photoshop for more advanced work. In fact, though, as you start exploring Lightroom’s sophisticated editing tools, you might discover you don’t need Photoshop as much as you thought. You might imagine that having two sets of editing tools in two different programs would make things confusing, but it doesn’t. The thing to remember about Lightroom’s adjustments is that they are ‘non-destructive’, just like those in Adobe Camera Raw. Whatever changes you make to your L 10 photos in Lightroom you can undo at any time. And you soon get to realise that Lightroom is especially good at some jobs, like basic tone and colour corrections, graduated filter effects and cropping, while Photoshop is best for others, such as multi-layer montages and more advanced special effects. So let’s see what sort of jobs you might do on a photo in Lightroom, how to hand it off to Photoshop for more advanced image-editing tasks, and how the edited version is automatically passed back to the Lightroom catalogue alongside the original. Best of all, the edited version is saved as a fully-layered Photoshop file, so that when you re-open it you can pick up where you left off. Teach yourself Photoshop ORGANISE YOUR IMAGES 1 Camera Calibration in Lightroom If you’re using Lightroom to organise your images, it takes over from Adobe Camera Raw – you make the same adjustments in the Develop module as you would in ACR. For example, here we’ve used the Camera Calibration tab to replicate our camera’s ‘Landscape’ colour rendition. 3 External editor preferences 5 Edit and save Before you send photos to an external editor, check the Lightroom Preferences and the External Editing tab. Photoshop CC should already be listed as the main choice, but make sure the file format is set to Photoshop PSD and set the bit depth to 16-bit for best quality. So here we’ve made a few changes to our picture in Photoshop, adding a tilt-shift blur effect which isn’t possible in Lightroom – and then we close the image to save it. It doesn’t need to be converted in any way or saved to a specific location because that’s already been chosen. 2 Lens Corrections in Lightroom 4 Open in Photoshop 6 Back in Lightroom Lightroom can also apply lens correction profiles for most common lenses. You’ll find these options in the Lens Correction panel. Make sure you check the ‘Remove Chromatic Aberration’ and ‘Constrain Crop’ boxes too. This will get rid of colour fringing and lens distortion. From now on, all you need to do to send an image from Lightroom to Photoshop is to right-click the photo and choose ‘Edit in > Edit in Adobe Photoshop CC 2015 from the context menu. Lightroom will send a converted 16bit PSD format file to Photoshop, where it will open. Now, if we head back to Lightroom we see that the new Photoshop-edited image has been added to the library alongside the existing one. If we need to, we can re-edit the original raw file in Lightroom and choose some different settings, or we can re-open the saved Photoshop file. 11 Teach yourself Photoshop ORGANISE YOUR IMAGES GET THE FILES HERE: http://bit.ly/typs2016 Introducing the Bridge workspace Get to know the key areas of Bridge’s photo-organising workspace and discover how to customise it to suit your needs ne of the biggest problems we face as digital photographers is our ever-growing collections of images. We may have thousands of photos scattered across hundreds of folders on our computers. These folders tend to display images according to when they were captured, so we have to rely on our memory of what was shot when as we search for a particular photo. O load via the Creative Cloud service, you’ll need to download Bridge separately. Bridge is a powerful image browser that enables you to take control over your digital assets before exporting them to Photoshop for editing. On this spread we’ll introduce you to the key features of Bridge, and demonstrate how to customise the workspace to display images in a more useful way. All versions of Photoshop attempt to deal with this asset management problem using similar tools. The Photoshop Elements Organizer allows you to add star ratings and keywords. Lightroom’s Library module does a similar job. Photoshop CC and CS use a companion application called Bridge to help you sort the wheat from the chaff. If you access the full version of Photoshop as a down- Photoshop Anatomy The Bridge workspace Get to know the key features of Adobe Bridge 4 METADATA 3 This panel emulates the display on your digital SLR. It reads the metadata stored in the currently active thumbnail so that you can discover what shutter speed, ISO and aperture settings where used to capture the image. It also shows the metering modes. 1 6 5 4 5 FILTERS This panel enables you to present files that meet specific criteria, such as those with a specific star rating. You can also filter the files’ metadata and discover images that were captured with a particular shutter speed setting, for example. 6 KEYWORDS 2 12 1 FOLDERS 2 THUMBNAILS 3 WORKSPACES Click the Folders tab to browse to any folder of images stored on your PC. Drag your most commonly used folders into the Favorites panel. Bridge displays your images as thumbnails. You can use the slider at the bottom of the workspace to increase the thumbnail size. These links enable you to change the way panels and images are displayed in Bridge. For example, the Filmstrip option gives you larger previews. This panel enables you to quickly assign descriptive keywords to a photo. You can then use the Filter panel to display photos that contain a specific keyword. We’ll demonstrate how to add and search for keywords later in this chapter. Teach yourself Photoshop ORGANISE YOUR IMAGES Overview Customising Adobe Bridge Take a closer look at your pictures using the Filmstrip view 1 5 6 2 4 3 1 FILMSTRIP 4 EDITED IMAGES By clicking the Filmstrip workspace icon you display the selected thumbnail at a much larger size in the Preview window. Shift-click to select and compare multiple images, as we’re doing in this image. If the colours, sharpness or tones of a raw format photo have already been adjusted in Photoshop, you’ll see this icon. You may also spot more specific icons that indicate that an image has been cropped, for example. 2 LOUPE VIEW 5 THUMBNAIL QUALITY The easiest way to see if an image is in focus is by looking at it at 100% magnification. To do so, click the image to activate the Loupe view. Drag the loupe to examine the image. We can see that the image on the right is blurred. By default you browse a raw file’s content by displaying the low-resolution thumbnail that was embedded with the file when it was captured. For a more accurate preview of colours and tones, click here and choose High Quality display. This will demand more processing power, however. 3 STACKING 6 SORT BY To stop similar-looking images from cluttering up the workspace, Shift-click to select them and then choose Stacks>Group As Stack. Click the play icon to see each thumbnail contained in a stack (or drag the scroll bar). To see your files in chronological order (with the oldest ones appearing on the left of the Filmstrip), set this Sort By dropdown menu to Date Created. You can also use this option in the Essential workspace to display the oldest files at the top. 13 Teach yourself Photoshop ORGANISE YOUR IMAGES GET THE FILES HERE: http://bit.ly/typs2016 Import your photos into Bridge Import images from your camera into Bridge, then organise and convert them in preparation for editing in Photoshop ridge is an application that comes included with all versions of Photoshop. If you’re not using Lightroom to import, organise and catalogue your images then Bridge is the perfect tool that fully integrates with Photoshop. You can launch it separately or use the File > Browse in Bridge menu command in Photoshop. (There was also a MiniBridge panel in Photoshop, B 1 but this was discontinued in 2014.) With Bridge, you can easily browse your images and incorporate them into your workflow. However, Bridge is so much more than a browser; you can also use it to add metadata, create image collections, group photos into stacks, apply star ratings, filter images and more besides. It also offers a host of other useful features too, such as the option to select multiple images and merge them. Attach your camera On the previous pages we pointed out how to use Bridge to browse images that are already stored on your computer, courtesy of the Folders panel. This panel acts like any browser or finder window. You can also use Bridge to import and store images directly from an attached camera or memory card into folders on your PC. Kick off by attaching your camera via a USB cable, and then click the Import Photos from Camera icon in Bridge. 14 2 CONVERT TO DNG If you choose the Convert to DNG option, the Photo Downloader will convert third-party raw format files (such as Canon’s CR2 or Nikon’s NEF) into the Adobe Digital Negative format as it imports them. It will preserve the original raw format files and create a DNG copy in a separate folder. We recommend you keep the original raw files somewhere very safe. Launch Photo Downloader A dialog will appear, inviting you to make the Photo Downloader launch automatically whenever a camera or card reader is attached. Click Yes or No as desired. You can always change this option later by choosing Adobe Bridge>Preferences>General and then tick or clear When Camera is Connected, Launch Adobe Photo Downloader. Whether you click Yes or No, the Photo Downloader window will appear. Teach yourself Photoshop ORGANISE YOUR IMAGES 3 Choose a location and label 5 Advanced options Click the Advanced Dialog button. Clear any thumbnails that you don’t want to import. In the Save Options section, click Choose and browse to where you want to store the files, or leave it set to the default Pictures folder. Set the Create Subfolders drop-down menu to choose your preferred folder labelling format, such as Shot Date (ddmmyy). You can also rename the source files to include the Shot Date. They will then be numbered sequentially. By default Adobe Bridge is set to open once you’ve imported the files. You can set the Photo Downloader to delete the original files on the memory card after they’ve been imported, so you can capture new images with the card without having to reformat it. You can also save copies of the imported files onto an external drive to create a backup of your photos. Click Choose to select your backup location. 4 Convert to DNG 6 Apply metadata In the Advanced Options panel you can decide to convert raw files to the DNG format as they are imported. This can be useful if you’re planning to share your raw files with other Photoshop users. Different camera manufacturers use different formats to create a raw version of an image and some of these can’t be opened in older versions of Photoshop. Adobe’s DNG format is also more compatible with third-party applications. If you plan to share your images electronically, it makes sense to attach your details and the copyright status, such as Creative Commons or Royalty Free, to each photo as it’s imported. This will save you the hassle of adding this information to individual files at a later date. We’ll look at ways to add more information to metadata on the following pages. Click Get Media to import the selected files. 15 Teach yourself Photoshop ORGANISE YOUR IMAGES GET THE FILES HERE: http://bit.ly/typs2016 Add metadata and keywords to your images Discover how to protect your photos and make them easier to find in the future t the end of the workflow on the previous spread we demonstrated how to quickly add your name and the copyright status to each file as it was imported to your computer by the Photo Downloader. This useful information is stored inside each file’s metadata, so when the image is shared online or emailed to a client they will know who it belongs to. The Photo Downloader only enables you to add a limited amount of information to a batch of images, but once you’re browsing your imported images in Bridge you can add much more useful data to them, such as your contact details and website address. This helps people contact you if they need to use the image, or at least credit you as its creator. In this walkthrough we’ll demonstrate how to edit fields in the IPTC Core panel to assign your contact and copyright details to a file’s metadata. You can add other useful details to metadata in Bridge, such as keywords that describe the contents of an image. This enables you to find a file according to its subject, instead of having to scroll through a chronological list of images trying to remember when you shot a particular picture. Keywords remain embedded in a file’s metadata, so they can be used by others to locate an image, which is handy if you want to sell your work as stock photography, for example. We’ll demonstrate quick ways to add keywords and then search for them using the filter tools in Bridge. A 16 Teach yourself Photoshop ORGANISE YOUR IMAGES 17 Teach yourself Photoshop ORGANISE YOUR IMAGES 1 Examine the metadata When importing images into Lightroom you can type your name into the Photo Downloader’s Creator field. If you’ve chosen this option, you can check that your name is attached to the file. Click the thumbnail of an image and then toggle open the IPTC Core section of the Metadata panel. Next to the Creator label you’ll see your name. If you didn’t add your name while importing, you can still do so by typing in the adjacent text field. 3 Apply the changes If your image contains a person or a place, then you can add the appropriate details in Bridge’s IPTC Extension panel. This panel also enables you to inform viewers of the image if there’s a model or property release form available, which is useful for purchasers of stock photography. Once you’ve finished editing the metadata, click anywhere outside the Metadata panel. You’ll then be asked if you want to apply the changes. Click Apply. 18 GET THE FILES HERE: http://bit.ly/typs2016 2 Assign your copyright You can also add your contact and website details to the file’s metadata by typing in the appropriate fields. Scroll down in the IPTC Core panel to find the Copyright Status popup menu. Choose an option such as Copyrighted. When the photograph is opened in Photoshop the image tab will display a © symbol, indicating that the image is copyrighted. Viewers of the image can go to File>Info and read the info that you’ve added. 4 Create a metadata template To speed up your workflow you can use Bridge to create a metadata template that contains useful generic information, such as your contact and copyright details. To do so, go to Tools>Create Metadata Template. Give the template a name, such as ‘My contact details’. Type in the information. Any properties you add will automatically be checked. Click Save. You can create as many custom metadata templates as you like. Teach yourself Photoshop ORGANISE YOUR IMAGES 5 Batch process the metadata Once you’ve created a custom metadata template you can apply it to multiple images. Shift-click to select a range of thumbnails in Bridge. Go to Tools and choose Append Metadata. You can then choose your custom metadata template. Your contact details will then be added to all the selected files in an instant. Click a thumbnail and check the Metadata panel’s IPTC Core section to see the added information. 7 Create new keywords To assign existing keywords to a selected image, tick the box next to a keyword category, such as People, or a subcategory, such as a person’s name. If a keyword isn’t available, click the flyout icon at the top right of the Keywords panel and choose New Keyword. Type the keyword into the text field. Hit Enter. Drag the new keyword into a particular category. Tick the new keyword to assign it to the selected thumbnails. 6 Add keywords 8 Filter via keywords The IPTC Core panel also has a keyword field, so you can add a series of descriptive keywords to a particular file, such as macro, butterfly, leaf etc. You could also add common keywords, such as your name, to a metadata template. To help you add keywords quickly, Bridge has a Keywords panel adjacent to the Metadata tab. Here you’ll find a collection of useful preset keywords, plus any that you’ve manually added to any images. To find images that contain a particular keyword, go to the Filter panel on the left of the Essentials workspace, then simply click a keyword in the list to display the appropriate thumbnails in the Preview window. You’ll see a number next to each keyword that indicates the number of files that contain that particular keyword in their metadata. You can also type keywords into the Search field at the top right of Bridge’s workspace. 19 Teach yourself Photoshop ORGANISE YOUR IMAGES GET THE FILES HERE: http://bit.ly/typs2016 Organise your images in Bridge Use Bridge’s asset management tools to help you find particular pictures quickly and easily using Collections s we revealed on the previous pages, Bridge enables you to create and assign keywords to single images or batches of images so that you can find them with ease using filters. Keywords provide one of the most powerful and useful ways of helping you to locate specific photographs, although Bridge has other tools that will help you to organise your ever-growing library of images. In pre-digital days we’d place our favourite prints into photo albums. These tended to gather and present images using particular themes, such as weddings or holidays, for example. In these digital days we have many more images A 20 to manage, so we can end up scrolling through hundreds of thumbnails in search of a particular image. In this walkthrough we’ll demonstrate how to use the old photo album model to collect themed images together so that they are easier to access, courtesy of Bridge’s Collections panel. You’ll also learn how to use the powerful Smart Collections feature to find photos according to specific metadata information, such as the shutter speed or camera model used to capture the images. We’ll kick off by demonstrating how to quickly separate the wheat from the chaff by assigning labels and star ratings to particular pictures.
- Xem thêm -