Tài liệu Level of autonomy on the management of vocational schools in hanoi city, vietnam

  • Số trang: 179 |
  • Loại file: PDF |
  • Lượt xem: 54 |
  • Lượt tải: 0
nhattuvisu

Đã đăng 27125 tài liệu

Mô tả:

i THAI NGUYEN UNIVERSITY Socialist Republic of Vietnam SOUTHERN LUZON STATE UNIVERSITY Republic of the Philippines LEVEL OF AUTONOMY ON THE MANAGEMENT OF VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS IN HANOI CITY, VIETNAM A RESEARCH PRESENTED TO THE FACULTY OF GRADUATE SCHOOL SOUTHERN LUZON STATE UNIVERSITY LUCBAN, QUEZON, PHILIPPINES THAI NGUYEN UNIVERSITY S.R. VIETNAM IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE DOCTORS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Phạm Quang Vinh (Stone) Thai Nguyen, 2013 ii APPROVAL SHEET In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree Doctor in Business Administration, this research study entitled LEVEL OF AUTONOMY ON THE MANAGEMENT OF VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS IN HANOI CITY, VIETNAM has been submitted by Phạm Quang Vinh (Stone) and is hereby recommended for oral examination. Prof Dr. Do Anh Tai Adviser Approved by the Oral Examination Committee, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree Doctor in Business Administration offered by Southern Luzon State University, Republic of the Philippines in collaboration with Thai Nguyen University, Socialist Republic of Vietnam. ………………………………………. Member ………………………………………. Member ………………………………………. Chairman Accepted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree Doctor in Business Administration offered by Southern Luzon State University, Republic of the Philippines in collaboration with Thai Nguyen University, Socialist Republic of Vietnam. ____________ Date TERESITA V. DE LA CRUZ, Ed. D Dean, Graduate School iii ACKNOWLEDGMENT In grateful recognition and sincerest thanks for the encouragement, guidance and unselfish sharing of their knowledge, time, effort and skills, and for the untiring motivation that leads to the completion of this study, the researcher acknowledges the following: DR. CECILIA N. GASCON, Ph.D., President of the Southern Luzon State University in the Republic of the Philippines, for her untiring effort and belief that this collaboration is possible thus enabling us to pursue the DBA degree; DR. DANG XUAN BINH, Ph.D., Director of the International Training Center, Thai Nguyen University of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, for his enormous pursuit to provide the Vietnamese people an opportunity to grow through education; DR. DO ANH TAI , Ph.D., his adviser, for guidance and endless support for the improvement of this study. ITC STAFF, for providing the necessary research materials; MANAGERS and STAFF of Vocational Schools in Hanoi city, my Respondents, for their patience and cooperation in answering the questionnaire and for other data given; MY FAMILY and FRIENDS, for the love and support in one-way or the other; and TO ALL who have contributed to make this study a success. Phạm Quang Vinh (Stone) iv DEDICATION This research is healthfully dedicated To my family and to all my relatives, my colleagues, friends, classmates, administrators, staffs and employees for Vocational Schools In Hanoi city. Phạm Quang Vinh (Stone) v Table of Contents Title Page Page Approval Sheet ii Acknowledgment iii Dedication iv Table of Contents v List of Figures x List of Table xi Abstracts xv Abbreviations xvi Chapter I. Problem and Its Setting 1 1.1. Introduction 1 1.2. Background of the study 2 1.3. Objective of study 4 1.4. Statement of the Problem 5 1.5. Hypotheses 5 1.6. Significance of the study 5 1.7. Scope and Limitations 6 1.8. Definition of terms 6 Chapter II. Review of Related Literatures and Studies 8 2.1. Related Concepts and Review of School Autonomy 8 2.1.1. Concept on Education and Vocational school 8 2.1.1.1. Education 8 2.1.1.2. Education as National and as Social 8 2.1.1.3. Vocational education 13 vi Title Page Page 2.1.2. The problems of autonomy and autonomy schools 19 2.1.2.1. Autonomy 19 2.1.2.2. Effective autonomy 20 2.1.2.3. School autonomy 21 2.1.3. Overview on status of education system and school autonomy in 34 Vietnam 2.1.3.1. Structure of Vietnam education system and its actives 34 2.1.3.2. Occupational Education Institutions 37 2.1.3.3. School Autonomy in Vietnam 38 2.1.4. The Factors related to school autonomy 40 2.2. Related Literatures and Studies 42 2.3. Conceptual Framework 45 Chapter III. Methodology 46 3.1. Research design 46 3.2. Determination of sample size 46 3.3. Sampling design and techniques 47 3.4. Subject of the study 47 3.5. Research instrument 47 3.6. Validation of the instrument 48 3.7. Data gathering procedure 48 3.8. Data processing method 49 3.9. Statistical treatment 49 Chapter IV. Presentation, Analysis and Interpretation of Data 50 4.1. Profile of respondents 50 vii Title Page 4.2. Assessment of the respondents on the existing level of autonomy on Page 52 management of Vocational schools in Hanoi city, Vietnam with regard to Identifying of Organizational autonomy, financial autonomy, Staffing autonomy, and Academic autonomy 4.2.1. Organizational autonomy in public and private vocational schools in 53 Hanoi city 4.2.1.1. Organizational autonomy in public vocational schools 53 4.2.1.2. Organizational autonomy in private vocational schools 57 4.2.1.3. Comparing of Organizational autonomy in public and private 61 vocational schools in Hanoi city 4.2.2. Finacial autonomy in public and private vocational schools in Hanoi 66 4.2.2.1. Finacial autonomy in public vocational schools 66 4.2.2.2. Finacial autonomy in private vocational schools 69 4.2.2.3. Compare Finacial autonomy in public and private vocational 72 schools in Hanoi 4.2.3. Staffing autonomy in public and private vocational schools in Hanoi 76 4.2.3.1. Staffing autonomy in public vocational schools 76 4.2.3.2. Staffing autonomy in private vocational schools 79 4.2.3.3. Compare Staffing autonomy in public and private vocational 82 schools in Hanoi 4.2.4. Academy autonomy in public and private vocational schools in Hanoi 86 4.2.4.1. Academy autonomy in public vocational schools 86 4.2.4.2. Academy autonomy in private vocational schools 89 4.2.4.3. Compare Academy autonomy in public and private vocational 92 schools in Hanoi 4.3. The autonomy factors were enjoined much or least of the vocational 96 viii Title Page Page schools as perceived by respondents 4.3.1. Determining importance of Organization autonomy in vocational 96 schools 4.3.2. Determining importance of Financial autonomy in vocational schools 98 4.3.3. Determining importance of Staffing autonomy in vocational schools 100 4.3.4. Determining importance of Academy autonomy in vocational schools 102 4.3.5. Sum up of importance of autonomy factors in vocational schools 104 4.4. Factors should be the extent of autonomy on the given indicators that 106 may be spelled out by Private and Public vocational schools. 4.5. Testing a significant differences between profile of respondents and their 108 perception on the level of autonomy on management of Vocational schools in Hanoi city, Vietnam Chapter 5. Findings, Conclusions and Recommendations 121 5.1. Summary 121 5.2. Findings 121 5.2.1. Demography 121 5.2.2. The existing level of autonomy on management of vocational schools 122 in Hanoi city 5.2.3. The autonomy factors were enjoined much or least of the vocational 123 schools as perceived by respondents 5.2.4. Items should be extent of autonomy on the given indicators that may 124 be spelled out by Private and Public vocational schools 5.2.5. Testing null hypothesis 124 5.3. Conclusions 125 5.4. Recommendations 126 5.4.1. Solutions to improve the management autonomy in vocational schools 126 ix Title Page Page in Hanoi 5.4.2. Other solutions 128 5.2.3. Planning to support the autonomy to develop the vocational schools 128 Bibliography 130 Appendix A: Questionaire Checklist 136 Appendix B: Raw Data 150 Appendix C: ANOVA Tables 151 Curriculum Vitae 161 x List of Figures Figures Title Page 2.1 Ability to keep a surplus 26 2.2 Ability to sell school-owned real Estate 27 2.3 Overall student numbers 32 2.4 The education system in Vietnam 35 2.5 Research model for assessment of level of autonomy on the management of vocational schools in Hanoi, Vietnam 45 xi List of Table Table Title Requirements 2.1 for implementing Page autonomy, assessment and accountability 20 2.2 Dimension of School autonomy 22 2.3 Qualifications of the executive head 23 2.4 Restrictions on senior academic staff recruiment 29 3.1 Description of Respondents 47 Ratting scale for respondent’s perception on contents in autonomy 3.2 3.3 actives at vocational schools in Hanoi city Type of data and methods of gatherning and processing 48 49 Frequency Distribution of Respondent’s Profile as Indicated by Age, 4.1.1 Gender, and Education 50 Frequency Distribution of Respondent’s Profile as Indicated by Length of 4.1.2 Services in the department, and working division 51 Mean Distribution of Responses on the existing level of autonomy on 4.2.1 management of Public Vocational schools in Hanoi city in terms of to 53 Identifying of Organizational autonomy Mean Distribution of Responses on the existing level of autonomy on 4.2.2 management of Private Vocational schools in Hanoi city in terms of to 57 Identifying of Organizational autonomy Composite of Mean Distribution of Responses on the existing level of 4.2.3 autonomy on management of Vocational schools in Hanoi city in terms 61 of to Identifying of Organizational autonomy Mean Distribution of Responses on the existing level of autonomy on 4.2.4 management of Public Vocational schools in Hanoi city in terms of to Identifying of Financial autonomy 66 xii Table Title Page Mean Distribution of Responses on the existing level of autonomy on 4.2.5 management of Private Vocational schools in Hanoi city in terms of to 69 Identifying of Financial autonomy Composite of Mean Distribution of Responses on the existing level of 4.2.6 autonomy on management of Vocational schools in Hanoi city in terms 73 of to Identifying of Financial autonomy Mean Distribution of Responses on the existing level of autonomy on 4.2.7 management of Public Vocational schools in Hanoi city in terms of to 76 Identifying of Staffing autonomy Mean Distribution of Responses on the existing level of autonomy on 4.2.8 management of Private Vocational schools in Hanoi city in terms of to 79 Identifying of Staffing autonomy Composite of Mean Distribution of Responses on the existing level of 4.2.9 autonomy on management of Vocational schools in Hanoi city in terms 82 of to Identifying of Staffing autonomy Mean Distribution of Responses on the existing level of autonomy on 4.2.10 management of Public Vocational schools in Hanoi city in terms of to 86 Identifying of Academic Mean Distribution of Responses on the existing level of autonomy on 4.2.11 management of Private Vocational schools in Hanoi city in terms of to 89 Identifying of Academic Composite of Mean Distribution of Responses on the existing level of 4.2.12 autonomy on management of Vocational schools in Hanoi city in terms 92 of to Identifying of Academic Mean Distribution of Responses on the importance of Organization 4.3.1 autonomy in public vocational schools in Public Vocational schools in 97 Hanoi city Mean Distribution of Responses on the importance of financial 4.3.2 autonomy in public vocational schools in Public Vocational schools in 99 xiii Table Title Page there is significant in relation between respondent’s working division and their perception on school autonomy in item of Hanoi city Mean Distribution of Responses on the importance of Staffing 4.3.3 autonomy in public vocational schools in Public Vocational schools in 101 Hanoi city Mean Distribution of Responses on the importance of Academic 4.3.4 autonomy in public vocational schools in Public Vocational schools in 103 Hanoi city Composite off Mean Distribution of Responses on the importance of 4.3.5 autonomy factors in vocational schools in Hanoi city 105 Mean Distribution of Responses on the Factors should be the extent of 4.4.1 autonomy on the given indicators that may be spelled out by Private and 107 Public vocational schools in Hanoi city Significant Difference between the Respondent’s position and their Perception 4.5.1a on the level of autonomy on management of Public vocational schools in 108 Hanoi city, Vietnam Significant Difference between the Respondent’s position and their Perception 4.5.1b on the level of autonomy on management of Private vocational schools in 109 Hanoi city, Vietnam Significant Difference between the Respondent’s age bracket and their 4.5.2a Perception on the level of autonomy on management of Public Vocational 110 schools in Hanoi city, Vietnam Significant Difference between the Respondent’s age bracket and their 4.5.2b Perception on the level of autonomy on management of Private Vocational 111 schools in Hanoi city, Vietnam Significant Difference between the Respondent’s Education and their 4.5.3a Perception on the level of autonomy on management of Public Vocational schools in Hanoi city, Vietnam 112 xiv Table Title Page Significant Difference between the Respondent’s Education and their 4.5.3b Perception on the level of autonomy on management of Private Vocational 113 schools in Hanoi city, Vietnam Significant Difference between the Respondent’s Gender and their Perception 4.5.4a on the level of autonomy on management of Public Vocational schools in 114 Hanoi city, Vietnam Significant Difference between the Respondent’s Gender and their Perception 4.5.4b on the level of autonomy on management of Private Vocational schools in 115 Hanoi city, Vietnam Significant Difference between the Respondent’s Experience and their 4.5.5a Perception on the level of autonomy on management of Public Vocational 116 schools in Hanoi city, Vietnam Significant Difference between the Respondent’s Experience and their 4.5.5b Perception on the level of autonomy on management of Private Vocational 117 schools in Hanoi city, Vietnam Significant Difference between the Respondent’s working division and their 4.5.6a Perception on the level of autonomy on management of Public Vocational 118 schools in Hanoi city, Vietnam Significant Difference between the Respondent’s working division and their 4.5.6b Perception on the level of autonomy on management of Private Vocational 119 schools in Hanoi city, Vietnam Significant Difference between Public and Private School’s Evaluation on the 4.5.7 level of autonomy on management of Vocational schools in Hanoi city, Vietnam 120 xv Abstract This dissertation with the title "LEVEL OF AUTONOMY ON THE MANAGEMENT OF VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS IN HANOI CITY, VIETNAM ", the objective of this study is to evaluate the reality autonomy of schools in vocational schools in Hanoi, review of literatures about the autonomy of schools in general and in vocational schools in particular. This study reviews operational status of autonomy in vocational schools in Hanoi through groups such as the basic criterion to determine the real situation and the key element for autonomy in vocational school in Hanoi. This study used methods of descriptive statistics, the method of comparison statistics and analysis of variance through the selection of two types of vocational school in Hanoi. It's public and private vocational schools. There are two groups of respondent in each type of school have been chosen to measure their perceptions about managing the operation autonomy in schools. Research has shown that the operating autonomy of the vocational school in Hanoi in the first phase of the cultural autonomy of schools. The concept, content and the policy on school autonomy has not been publicized. Hypothesis test results also show that there is not much difference in the perception of the respondent group about the status of content management autonomy in vocational schools in Hanoi. xvi ABBREVIATIONS AT Austria BE fr Belgium/French Community BE nl Belgium/Flemish Community BG Bulgaria BPNT Basic Psychological Needs Theory CET Cognitive Evaluation Theory CH Switzerland COT Causality Orientations Theory CY Cyprus CZ Czech Republic DE Germany DK Denmark EE Estonia ES Spain FI Finland FR France GCT Goal Contents Theory GDV General Department of Vocational GR Greece HNETO Hanoi Education and Training Office HR Croatia HRM Human Recourse Management HU Hungary IS Iceland IT Italy LT Lithuania LU Luxembourg LV Latvia MOET Ministry of Education and Training MOLISA Ministry of Labour - Invalids - Social Affairs MT Malta NL Netherlands xvii NO Norway OEI Occupational Education Institution OIT Organism Integration Theory PIED Professional Intermediate Education Department PIS Professional Intermediate School PL Poland PT Portugal RO Romania RS Serbia SDT Self-Determination Theory SE Sweden SI Slovenia SK Slovak Republic TR Turkey UK United Kingdom VC Vocational College VS Vocational School 1 CHAPTER I THE PROBLEM AND ITS SETTING 1.1. Introduction Autonomy is a topic of great interest, which is often mentioned in the forums of education - training in Vietnam. It is most concerned by the schools as well as the state management agencies with many opinions and conflicting viewpoints. Although the general direction is bold autonomy and self-responsibility of the schools to increase their flexibility, many specific issues that are given out to discuss such as: Licensing and how to license; How is the mechanism of state control to let off without relinquishing management while enhancing the effective operation of the school, etc. Autonomy of institutions in the field of education is understood as self-determination and self-responsibility under the laws and the requirements of society for all its activities such as finance, personnel and organizational structure, training programs, strategic planning, etc. Under the provisions of Vietnam laws, the level of autonomy of the education and training institutions (collectively, the schools) depends on the type of school. Currently in Vietnam, the system of Occupational Education includes the Professional Intermediate Schools, Vocational Schools, Vocational Colleges, and some Colleges and Universities, which has Vocational Education models (after here, referred to as Vocational School) under two different types (Nguyen Duc Toan, 2010): - Private Schools: all of them are full autonomy. - Public Schools: three kinds that are none autonomy, partial autonomy, and full autonomy. Each type of school is influenced by the different legal documents and regulations on its autonomy. Autonomy does not mean relinquishing management from the state. In contrast, autonomy given to schools is considered as one of the most important solutions to bring motivations, new life for training institutions to improve the efficiency, educational quality and social responsibility of the schools. Vietnam is in the process of institutional transformation from the planning bureaucracy - subsidy economy to the market economy completely. Accordingly, education 2 and training is not only seen as a public utility sector, but also considered an important service sector that has been contributing significantly to the sustainable development of market economy. Ensuring autonomy for training institutions is a prerequisite for these institutions to adjust their activities in accordance with market mechanism, which requires the dynamic, creation, activeness and accepts the changes frequently. The scope of this study will try to approach a relative full - autonomy of the occupational education institutions and its impacts on the activities of these schools; This study also will try to compare the existing legal provisions issue with some experiences of developed countries to put forward some recommendations to improve and enhance the effectiveness of the policy framework for Occupational Education field as well as the advancement of each school. 1.2. Background of the study The developments towards a different model of governance in many advanced societies have been characterized with the phrase “regulatory state” (Moran 2002), i.e. a state where direct public ownerships is replaced by regulating more autonomous units. Higher education is subject to similar changes and is waiting for a systematic analysis from a regulatory approach (King 2007). As a general rule, vocational schools have become more autonomous – free from line-itemized budgets, input control, and detailed prescriptions on curricula (Santiago et al. 2008). The greater autonomy is at the same time balanced by new accountability mechanisms (Santiago et al. 2008). Therefore, the autonomy of the schools is limited to make the selection of the training majors as well as to determine the suitable training model upon requests of the labour markets and training capacities of schools actively. With the Circular No115/2010/ND-CP dated 24/12/2010 of the Government, this responsibility has been transferred to the local Education & Training departments. However, these departments are also getting many embarrassments and difficulties in dealing with this new task which leads to the delays, lack of the uniformity on the steps of approving the procedures to open new majors and giving the annual recruitment quantity, GOV (2010). At present, Vietnam doesn’t have enough the particular laws to encourage the enterprises and schools to cooperate closely so as to train students to meet the demands of the labour market. Schools still train students with their own programs without being concerned much about what the labour market requires. The stagnations, the inactiveness of the schools 3 are affected directly by the management methods, which are lack of the motivation and exist the bureaucracies of the managers and leaders. The Vietnam Educational Law still remains the classification of the state management function in the area of occupational education for the MOET (manage the intermediate professional schools) and MOLISA (manage the vocational schools, vocational colleges). This separation has caused the inequality, dispersion and reduced effectiveness of the resources invested in the occupational education area. Moreover, it also limits the autonomy of the occupational education institutions to diversify the training programs, levels of training, and the links among the training programs and levels of training. Beside, being lack of the financial resources is one of the main reasons that cause the limitations of the autonomy of the occupational education institutions, especially the autonomy and self - responsibilities for the training quality. In addition, the effectiveness of the financial investments for occupational education area is not high, not focused, and hasn’t encouraged the schools to improve the quality. The private occupational education institutions will encounter a lot of difficulties in dealing with the procedures to ask for permission to open new school, being provided with lands to build school, approving the training programs. They are not behaved as equally as the public schools and it is difficult for them to approach supported policies for the development of occupational education from the Government. Therefore, the autonomy of the private schools in Vietnam is considered like the laxity and lack of support at some points. Some major problems exist in occupational education policy in Vietnam at present: The classification and allocation of the state management in the occupational education are inappropriate. There are many different points between the MOET and MOLISA on development policy of the occupational education system that hasn’t been solved properly (Nguyen Van Khoi , 2012). The unbalanced allocation of investment projects to develop vocational capacity between vocational schools and intermediate professional schools. The development of the intermediate professional education system is not paid attention properly by MOET. It is lack of transparency and consistency in decentralized management occupational education sector between the state management agencies. These problems cause a lot of obstacles and embarrassing for the occupational educational institutions in implementing their autonomy. The coexistence of two systems of the state management in occupational education leads to inconsistencies, inequalities among different models of schools.
- Xem thêm -